Monthly Archives: September 2015

DaSH Session for October 2

Hi DaSHers,
This week at DaSH we will have Jo Whittaker from IMAS telling us all about how to produce publication-ready maps and figures using the package GMT (http://gmt.soest.hawaii.edu/). GMT is an open source collection of command-line tools for manipulating geographic and Cartesian data sets  and producing PostScript illustrations ranging from simple x–y plots via contour maps to artificially illuminated surfaces and 3D perspective views. Jo is pretty keen on GMT, and from what she has shown me so far I may soon be keen on it too. So if you think your usual analysis software is a bit limited and clunky when it comes to figures for publication then GMT may be just what you are looking for.

Stuart

ALSO
Coming up in the next week or so we will be holding a session with some experienced operators showing you how to best plot those common figures that we all need from time to time. Examples that I can think of include; maximal or minimal sea ice extent; location of the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, bathymetry for somewhere (or everywhere) or climatological sea surface temperature or ocean colour. Where do those data sets come from, and how best to plot them in various packages?

Where:
Rori Flex Room, IMAS Building, Castray Esplanade

When
Friday October 2, 9:15 am

Mathematica presentation on Friday 18 September

Hi DaSHers,
I have been asked to advertise  a presentation being given by Craig Bauling from Wolfram Research (the makers of Mathematica). If you use, or are interested in Mathematica then check out the details below

Stuart

Subject: Wolfram Mathematica presentation, 1pm Friday September 18, PLT3

 Good afternoon:

Tomorrow, Craig Bauling from Wolfram Research (Mathematica) in the US will be giving a presentation in Physics Lecture Theatre 3 at 1pm.

Roland Warner (ACE CRC) and I have been in contact with Craig recently as we’re both looking to upgrade licences (Maths has version 8 in our labs which puts us two full versions behind what is currently available).  I presume Craig will be showing off the capabilities of version 10 to help us with our decision.

 I’ve taken Craig’s bio from the Wolfram website and attached it below. You’ll note that the Victorian Education Department has a Mathematica licence covering all of its public schools. I think Wolfram were successful in convincing V.Ed. to take on Mathematica/WolframAlpha by showing its usefulness in areas outside of those with a maths focus.  So feel free to forward on this invitation to anyone who has the slightest interest in accessing information and/or exploring/analysing data.

Regards,

Michael

 

Hello, I’m Craig Bauling with Wolfram Research. As an International Business Development team member, I put 30 years experience in Engineering and Education to work helping others. My passion is in Education, especially at the secondary and community college levels (TAFE). Recently I have had the pleasure to help the state of Victoria Australia adapt curriculum materials using the state’s Unlimited Mathematica public school license pool. Separately, I have had the pleasure of supporting the Victoria Curriculum Assessment Authority (VCAA) in their use of Mathematica to develop their annual statewide Math exam with Mathematica and then deploy those exams as part of the student/curriculum assessment process. I love gaming challenges, business applications and lesson planning with Mathematica.

 _____________________________________________

Michael Brideson, PhD
Lecturer – Discipline of Mathematics

Email: michael.brideson@utas.edu.au
 

DaSH Session for September 18

Hi DaSHers,
Sorry for the late notice. This week we finish off our three week exploration of the differences and similarities of the different programming languages used for data science. The focus this week is on examples of what your preferred language does well. If you are an R user and just know that R does stats better than anything else then bring along an example showing us the really cool stuff it does. If you know Matlab is best for linear algebra and manipulation of large, regularly gridded dataset then show us just how easy it is to do that stuff.

We will have a few examples lined up ready to go when we kick off tomorrow, but it would be great for attendees to bring some more ideas along. We can then explore how each language does what it does, and maybe try those ideas out in other languages.

Or, if you are new to programming, then just come along and find out the neat stuff your language of choice can do.

Stuart

ALSO:
Coming up in the next week or so we will be holding a session with some experienced operators showing you how to best plot those common figures that we all need from time to time. Examples that I can think of include; maximal or minimal sea ice extent; location of the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, bathymetry for somewhere (or everywhere) or climatological sea surface temperature or ocean colour. Where do those data sets come from, and how best to plot them in various packages.

Where:
Rorie Flex Room, IMAS Building, Castray Esplanade

When:
Friday September 18, 9:15 am

DaSH Session for September 4

Hi DaSHers,
This week DaSH will be answering the eternal question of data scientists: which language is better – Matlab or R? Or maybe python is better than both of them. Then again maybe you think Fortran or C are the best options and those fancy new languages carry too much baggage to be really useful for serious work. Looks like we may have trouble even framing the question to everyone’s satisfaction, let along answering it in 45 minutes.

Nonetheless, if you have a favourite data programming language come along and tell us the features you think make it the weapon of choice for your data needs. if you don’t have a favourite (or don’t know any of them well enough) then come along and learn about the differences between languages and maybe how you can decide which one is for you (Esperanto anyone?).

The aim of this discussion will be to explore the strengths of different languages for specific tasks. Maybe we will discover that they are all essentially the same and thus choice comes down to personal preference. Is there really any difference between any of them anymore? Or maybe we will walk away with a realisation that there is only one true language and most of us have invariable been wrong (seems unlikely though).

Stuart

Where:
Rori Flex Room. IMAS Building, Castray Esplanade

When:
Friday September 11, 9:15 am

DaSH Session for September 4

Hi DaSHers,
This week DaSH is undergoing a structural review. That is, we are going to be discussing and (hopefully) explaining the strengths of, and reasons for using, different structures in programming languages (eg R, Matlab, C, python and fortran). Structures (sometimes called pointers, or even cells) are used in most languages and are a good way of minimising memory requirements and increasing flexibility in programming. However they are a bit hard to understand on occasions. We will be starting form scratch with structures and discussing what, where, how and why.

And as always with DaSH, if you have any other data science issues bring them along and we will try and sort you out.

Stuart

Where:

Rori Flex Room, IMAS Building, Castray Esplanade

When

Friday 14 August, 9:15 am